Amazon’s Alexa as a presentation layer over a Tableau dashboard integrated with Arria’s NLG technology

A Big Day for Arria at VOICE Summit 2019
Greg Williams

I write this dispatch while sitting with Arria teammates outside of the crowded meeting space where Arria’s COO, Jay DeWalt, and Chief Scientist, Ehud Reiter, are unveiling the breakthrough use of Amazon’s Alexa as a presentation layer over a Tableau dashboard integrated with Arria’s NLG technology. We’re happy to listen through the open door, giving up our seats to VOICE Summit attendees, many of whom we met at the Arria booth this morning. It’s great to see interest in Natural Language Generation at such high levels. NLG occupies a unique and absolutely essential layer of the technology stack that will make possible dynamic, multi-turn conversations with machines.

Jay and Ehud are joined by Kapila Ponnamperuma, Arria’s Head of Technology Integrations, and we know that Kapila is going to demonstrate the technology live in a few minutes. Since we’ve seen the demo, we know what the audience is in for. BI dashboards plus NLG are already impressive enough. Just wait until the attendees witness Kapila asking questions related to sales performance, and Alexa responding intelligently, remembering context to support follow-on questions. . . .

In the presentation leading up to the demo, Jay and Ehud make the point that data comprehension is more difficult when looking at raw data than at visuals, and more difficult when looking at visuals alone than at visuals combined with narrative written in natural human language. Hence the rapid pace of Arria’s BI dashboard integrations.

By combining an Arria-integrated BI dashboard with Alexa, or other conversational platforms, Arria takes it one step further: facilitating dynamic conversational AI for business.

Arria at the VOICE SummitArria stands out at VOICE Summit in being one of the few exhibitors primarily interested in business applications rather than consumer applications. (We also happen to be wearing fluorescent neon orange golf shirts, selected by SVP of Strategic Partnerships and Business Development, Lyndsee Manna, so we’re easy to spot.) Arria is dedicated to using the power of language to helping businesses achieve greater efficiency, discover deeper insights in their data, and ultimately make better, smarter decisions than their competitors.

Update—A Few Minutes Later

It was an extraordinary demo, extraordinarily well-received. Kapila quizzed Alexa about sales performance across multiple measures and dimensions. Conversationally, without a mouse, he achieved the equivalent of drilling down into a BI dashboard, and the audience heard Arria respond immediately with actionable information.

In the discussion that followed, Kapila made the point that if you have an existing BI Dashboard, you can be up and running in hours, with a sophisticated multi-turn conversation application that remembers context to facilitate follow-on questions.

The audience and the Arria presenters were so engaged with one another that an administrator had to call time in order to clear the room for the next session. Jay offered to continue the session in the hallway. Clusters of attendees kept him and Ehud busy fielding questions for another half an hour.

Tomorrow we’ll check in after Cathy Herbert delivers her VED Talk in the afternoon. (“TED Talk,” but with a V for VOICE.) Cathy will provide guidance on how companies can position themselves to take advantage of the forthcoming avalanche of improvements in Natural Language Generation, particularly when the NLG platform offers built-in computational and linguistic functions and is paired with a conversation platform such as Alexa.

Until then, signing off.

Analytics Are Defining The Future Of Digital Advertising

Advertisers are planning to increase the average number of integrated data sources from 5.4 today to 6.2 in 2019, searching for new customer and advertising effectiveness insights. The Salesforce study found that customer relationship management (CRM), online, and demographic data are the three most common data sources integrated as part of broader marketing technology stacks. As advertisers and marketers focus on increasing Marketing Qualified Leads (MQLs) and Sales Qualified Leads (SQLs), marketing automation system-based data is becoming a must-have for tracking advertising effectiveness.
91% of advertisers have or plan to adopt a data management platform (DMP) in the next fiscal year.
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THINKSTOCKPHOTO

These and other insights are from Salesforce’s Digital Advertising 2020 Report published today (18 pp., PDF, no opt-in). The study is based on a global survey of 900 advertising leaders across North America, Europe, and the Asia-Pacific region. The study illustrates new priorities, strategies, and tactics that signify the accelerating growth of data-driven advertising.  Please see the report for additional details regarding respondent demographics and the methodology.

Key takeaways from the study include the following:

  • Advertisers are planning to increase the average number of integrated data sources from 5.4 today to 6.2 in 2019, searching for new customer and advertising effectiveness insights. The Salesforce study found that customer relationship management (CRM), online, and demographic data are the three most common data sources integrated as part of broader marketing technology stacks. As advertisers and marketers focus on increasing Marketing Qualified Leads (MQLs) and Sales Qualified Leads (SQLs), marketing automation system-based data is becoming a must-have for tracking advertising effectiveness.
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SOURCE: SALESFORCE’S DIGITAL ADVERTISING 2020 REPORT
  • 47% of advertisers in North America will increase their use of third-party data in the next year, the largest increase among regions. Advertisers are looking to establish 2nd and 3rd party partnerships to tap into data sources they don’t own to gain more inputs into decision-making, ad targeting, and ad effectiveness.  Over the next two years, advertisers’ use of second- and third-party data will grow by 26% and 30%, respectively.
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SOURCE: SALESFORCE’S DIGITAL ADVERTISING 2020 REPORT
  • 91% of advertisers have or plan to adopt a data management platform in the next fiscal year. As brands rely on multiple data sources to target audiences, they’re increasingly turning to data management platforms (DMPs) to import that data, find segments to target and send instructions to networks and By 2019 an advertiser’s ability to integrate diverse databases and gain insights faster than competitors will have a significant impact on sales growth. The Salesforce study found data management platforms are at a tipping point. While just 20% of companies have been using a DMP for more than three years, an additional 21% are either currently implementing a DMP or have done so in the past year.
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SOURCE: SALESFORCE’S DIGITAL ADVERTISING 2020 REPORT

Healthcare Virtual Assistants Market Expected to reach $3,133.6 million by 2026 growing at a CAGR of 32.7%

Global Healthcare Virtual Assistants Market is accounted for $245.7 million in 2017 and is expected to reach $3,133.6 million by 2026 growing at a CAGR of 32.7% during the forecast period. Some of the key factors influencing the market growth include increasing demand for healthcare applications, riding prevalence of chronic disorders and growing demand for quality healthcare delivery. However, need of prepared data in the healthcare industry is restraining the market growth.

Healthcare Virtual Assistants are used in the healthcare industry in organize to raise patient date to a higher standard. Patient engagement is an approach used in order to improve health outcomes and better enduring care at lower costs. The facilitates healthcare organization to collect demographic in order, insurance details, and tolerant health history, finance/costing, procurement details, data mining and more analysis of all the records.

Get Sample Copy at https://www.reportsweb.com/inquiry&RW00012793380/sample

Amongst Product, Smart Speakers segment is expected to remain attractive during the forecast period owing to increase consumer preference for technologically advanced products. Smart speakers are multifunctional, fast, wide-ranging, and consistent solutions. By Geography, Asia Pacific is expected to grow at the largest market share during the forecast period. Increasing geriatrics population, high diffusion of smartphones, technological advancements, the growing use of isolated monitoring devices, and growing healthcare costs.

Some of the key players in Verint Systems Inc., Infermedica , Sensely, Inc., Microsoft Corporation, CSS Corporation, Egain Corporation, Kognito Solutions, LLC, Healthtap, Inc., Babylon Healthcare Services Limited, ADA Digital Health, Amazon, Nuance Communications, Inc., True Image Interactive, Inc., Datalog.AI and Medrespond LLC.

User Interfaces Covered:
– Text-To-Speech
– Text-Based
– Automatic Speech Recognition
– Other User Interfaces

Products Covered:
– Chatbots
– Smart Speakers

What our report offers:
– Market share assessments for the regional and country level segments
– Strategic recommendations for the new entrants
– Market forecasts for a minimum of 9 years of all the mentioned segments, sub segments and the regional markets
– Market Trends (Drivers, Constraints, Opportunities, Threats, Challenges, Investment Opportunities, and recommendations)
– Strategic analysis: Drivers and Constraints, Product/Technology Analysis, Porter’s five forces analysis, SWOT analysis etc.
– Strategic recommendations in key business segments based on the market estimations
– Competitive landscaping mapping the key common trends
– Company profiling with detailed strategies, financials, and recent developments
– Supply chain trends mapping the latest technological advancements

Make an Inquiry https://www.reportsweb.com/inquiry&RW00012793380/buying

Table of Contents:

1 Executive Summary

2 Preface

3 Market Trend Analysis

4 Porters Five Force Analysis

5 Global Healthcare Virtual Assistants Market, By User Interface

6 Global Healthcare Virtual Assistants Market, By Product

7 Global Healthcare Virtual Assistants Market, By Application

8 Global Healthcare Virtual Assistants Market, By End User

9 Global Healthcare Virtual Assistants Market, By Geography

10 Key Developments

11 Company Profiling
11.1 Verint Systems Inc.
11.2 Infermedica
11.3 Sensely, Inc.
11.4 Microsoft Corporation
11.5 CSS Corporation
11.6 Egain Corporation
11.7 Kognito Solutions, LLC
11.8 Healthtap, Inc.
11.9 Babylon Healthcare Services Limited
11.10 ADA Digital Health
11.11 Amazon
11.12 Nuance Communications, Inc.
11.13 True Image Interactive, Inc.
11.14 Datalog.AI
11.15 Medrespond LLC.

For More Information about This Report: https://www.reportsweb.com/reports/healthcare-virtual-assistants-global-market-outlook-2017-2026

Contact Us:

Call: +1-646-491-9876
Email: sales@reportsweb.com

Amazon brings Alexa announcements to Fire TV and completes YouTube rollout

Amazon today announced that its Alexa announcements feature is launching on all Fire TV devices in countries where the intercom-like functionality is available. It’s useful for getting a message to everyone at once — “dinner’s ready,” “the movie is starting,” etc.

If someone in your home or apartment makes an announcement through an Echo speaker or another Alexa-compatible device, you’ll see a notification on-screen. Whatever you’re watching or listening to on the Fire TV will temporarily pause, and the message will be played. Once the announcement is done, your content will resume automatically. You can also record your own announcements with the Fire TV’s Alexa voice remote. (If you don’t want TV time to be interrupted, announcements can be disabled for your Fire TV.)

Additionally, after making its long-awaited return last month, Amazon says the YouTube app is expanding to all Fire TV devices. So no matter which one of the company’s streaming gadgets you use, you’ll once again have access to a native, official YouTube app. Today, it’s coming to the original Fire TV Stick, Fire TV, and second- and third-generation Fire TV devices.

Google makes a subtle but important change to the Search app

A look at the updated version of the Google Search app reveals that Google is phasing out its Voice Search feature in favor of the Google Assistant. Voice Search could be found in the Google Search app and on the app’s widget. The iconic microphone icon, when tapped, would allow the user to verbally request a search. But now, Google wants its virtual digital assistant to take over all voice searches.

Spotted first by 9to5Google, a subtle change can be found in the Google Search app (aka the Google app) in version 10.24 or 10.28 beta. The microphone icon once found on the right-hand side of the search bar has been replaced with the Google Assistant icon. In addition, the old search bar included the words “Say Hey Google” while the updated version now reads “Ask any question.”
Google Assistant is at the heart of the Google ecosystem. It is considered to be the best digital assistant among the top four, a group that also includes Amazon’s Alexa, Apple’s Siri and Microsoft’s Cortana. According to Google, there are now over 1 million actions that Google Assistant can handle. And with Assistant available on all of the Google Home smart speakers and the Nest Hub smart displays, replacing Voice Search with Google Assistant is a way for the company to bring all of its apps and devices in sync with each other.

Apple had a head start with Siri, but Google Assistant has surpassed Apple’s digital helper

Google hasn’t finished rolling this update out to everyone yet, but it is easy to check to see if it has hit your phone. Simply open the Google Search app and check out which icon is in the search bar.
The first virtual assistant found on a smartphone was Siri, which debuted with the Apple iPhone 4s on October 4, 2011. Apple had acquired the technology when it purchased Siri Inc. in 2010. At the time, Siri was a concierge app in the Apple App Store and its developers planned to offer it for Android and BlackBerry devices. Even though Apple had a head start in this space, some of the company’s former employees said last year that Apple lost its vision for Siri the day after it was first introduced on the iPhone 4s; that was the day that Steve Jobs died.
Meanwhile, several tests have shown that Google Assistant recognizes questions and gives appropriate responses better than Siri. An extensive test was conducted last year of the four major digital assistants by venture capital firm Loup Ventures and its analyst Gene Munster. The test showed that Google Assistant answered correctly or performed the correct actions better than its rivals in all five categories that were being tested (Local, Commerce, Navigation, Information and Command). Siri finished last in three of the categories and only got 12% of navigation queries correctly. Alexa finished second in four of the categories while Cortana finished third in three of the classifications.
The aforementioned test was conducted on smart speakers. So a few months later, Loup put the assistants through the paces again, but this time it used different smartphones. Google Assistant on a Pixel XL understood all 800 of the questions asked. Siri misunderstood 11 queries while Alexa and Cortana missed 13 and 19, respectively. Google Assistant won four out of the five categories (Local, Commerce, Navigation and Information) while finishing second in one of them. Siri placed second in four categories, topping Google Assistant in Command. Alexa was all over the place with a second-place finish (Information), three third-place finishes (Local-tie, Commerce, Information, Command) and wound up last in one category (Navigation). Cortana was ranked last in three categories (Commerce, Information, Command), and finished third twice (Local-tie, Navigation).

Google Assistant has started to take charge of ‘Voice search’ in Google app

The ability to search the web with the voice came way earlier than digital assistants. And now with digital assistants, users are able to not only use their voice as a means to search the web but also get to use it by typing on the keyboard, thereby eliminating the need to have a standalone “voice search.”

Speaking of voice search, Google has spent a lot of resources in pushing Google Assistant, and as a result, it is probably the best in the market. Weirdly enough, Google Assistant never really took charge of the “voice search” in the Google app — until now.

Google has started to replace the voice search icon with the Google Assistant icon, meaning that all the queries are now going to be performed by Google Assistant. However, the UI hasn’t changed much.

The new feature is being rolled out in a phased manner, which means that you might not get to see the change right now. Note, users, who speak languages that Google Assistant does not recognize, won’t get to see the change.

via: 9to5google

A New Era of Google Search: What It Means for SEO

Important changes are happening at Google and, in a world where marketing and algorithms intersect, those changes are largely happening under the radar.

The future of search looks like it will have considerably less search in it, and this isn’t just about the end of the 10 blue links, but about much more fundamental changes.

Let’s talk about some of those changes now, and what they mean for SEO.

Google Discover

Google Discover is a content recommendation engine that suggests content across the web based on a user’s search history and behavior.

Discover isn’t completely new (it was introduced in December of 2016 as Google Feed). But Google made an important change in late October (announced in September) when they added it to the Google homepage.

The revamp and rebranding to Discover added features like:

  • Topic headers to categorize feed results.
  • More images and videos.
  • Evergreen content, as opposed to just fresh content.
  • A toggle to tell Google if you want more or less content similar to a recommendation.
  • Google claims the recommendations are personalized to your level of expertise with a topic.

Google Discover hardly feels revolutionary at first. In fact, it feels overdue.

Our social media feeds are already dominated by content recommendation engines, and the YouTube content recommendation engine is responsible for 70%of the time spent on the site.

But Discover could have massive implications for the future of how users interact with content of the web.

While it’s unlikely Discover will ever reach the 70% level of YouTube’s content recommendation engine, if it swallows even a relatively small portion of Google search, say 10%, no SEO strategy will be complete without a tactic for earning that kind of traffic, especially since it will allow businesses to reach potential customers who aren’t even searching for the relevant terms yet.

Google Assistant

For most users, Google Assistant is a quiet and largely invisible revolution.

Its introduction to Android devices in February 2017 likely left most users feeling like it was little more than an upgraded Google Now, and in a sense that’s exactly what it is.

But as Google Assistant grows, it will increasingly influence how users interact with the web and decrease reliance on search.

Like its predecessor, Assistant can:

  • Search the web.
  • Schedule events and alarms.
  • Show Google account info.
  • Adjust device settings.

But the crucial difference is its ability to engage in two-way conversations, allowing users to get answers from the system without ever even looking at a search result.

An incredibly important change for the future of business and the web is the introduction of Google Express, the capability to add products to a shopping cart and order them entirely through Assistant.

But this feature is limited to businesses that are explicitly partnered with Google Express, an incredibly dramatic change from the Google search engine and its crawling of the open web.

Assistant can also identify what some images are. Google Duplex, an upcoming feature, will also allow Assistant to call businesses to schedule appointments and other similar actions on the user’s behalf.

The more users rely on Assistant, the less they will rely on Google search results, and the more businesses who hope to adapt will need to think of other ways to:

  • Leverage Assistant’s algorithms and other emerging technologies to fill in the gaps.
  • Adjust their SEO strategies to target the kind of behavior that is exclusive to search and search alone.

Google’s Declaration of a New Direction

Circa Google’s 20th anniversary, Google announced that its search product was closing an old chapter and opening a new one, with important new driving principles added.

They started by clarifying that these old principles wouldn’t be going away:

  • Focusing on serving the user’s information needs.
  • Providing the most relevant, high-quality information as quickly as possible.
  • Using an algorithmic approach.
  • Rigorously testing every change, including using quality rating guidelines to define search goals.

This means you should continue:

  • Putting the user first.
  • Being accurate and relevant.
  • Having some knowledge of algorithms.
  • Meeting Google’s quality rating guidelines.

But the following principles represent a dramatically new direction for Google Search:

Shifting from Answers to Journeys

Google is adding new features that will allow users to “pick up where they left off,” shifting the focus away from short-term answers to bigger, ongoing projects.

This currently already includes activity cards featuring previous pages visited and queries searched, the ability to add content to collections, and tabs that suggest what to learn about next, personalized to the user’s search history.

A new Topic layer has also been added to the Knowledge Graph, allowing Google to surface evergreen content suggestions for users interested in a particular topic.

Shifting from Queries to Queryless Ways to Provide Information

Perhaps the most important change to watch carefully, Google is looking for ways to help users who don’t even make a search query.

Google Discover is central to this effort and the inclusion of evergreen content, not just fresh content, represents an important change in how Google is thinking about the feed. This means more and more traditional search content will become feed content instead.

Shifting from Text to Visual Representation

Google is making important changes in the way information is presented by adding new visual capabilities.

They are introducing algorithmically generated AMP Stories, video compilations with relevant caption text like age and notable events in a person’s life.

New featured videos have been added to search, designed to offer an overview on topics you are interested in.

Image search has also been updated so that images featured on pages with relevant content take priority and pages where the image is central to the content rank better. Captions and suggested searches have been added as well.

Finally, Google Lens allows you to perform visual search based on objects that Google’s AI can detect in the image.

These changes to search are slipping under the radar somewhat for now, since user behavior rarely changes overnight.

But the likelihood that these features and Google’s new direction will have a dramatic impact on how search works is very high.

SEOs who ignore these changes and continue operating with a 2009 mindset will find themselves losing ground to competitors.

SEO After Search

While queries will always be an important part of the way we find information online, we’re now entering a new era of search.

An era that demands we start changing the way we think about SEO soon, while we can capitalize on the changing landscape.

The situation is not unlike when Google first came on the scene in 1998 when new opportunities were on the horizon that most at the time were unaware of and ill-prepared for.

As the technological landscape changes, we will need to alter our strategies and start thinking about questions and ideas like these in our vision for the future of our brands:

  • Less focus on queries and more focus on context appears inevitable. Where does our content fit into a user’s journey? What would they have learned before consuming it, and what will they need to know next? Note that this is much more vital than simply a shift from keywords to topics, which has been happening for a very long time already. Discovery without queries is much more fundamental and impacts our strategies in a much more profound way.
  • How much can we incorporate our lead generation funnel into that journey as it already exists, and how much can we influence that journey to push it in a different direction?
  • How can we create content and resources that users will want to bookmark and add to collections?
  • Why would Google recommend our content as a useful evergreen resource in Discover, and for what type of user?
  • Can we partner with Google on emerging products? How do we adapt when we can’t?
  • How should we incorporate AMP stories and similar visual content into our content strategy?
  • What type of content will always be exclusive to query-based search, and should we focus more or less on this type of content?
  • What types of content will Google’s AI capacities ultimately be able to replace entirely, and on what timeline? What will Google Assistant and it’s successors never be able to do that only content can?
  • To what extent is it possible for SEOs to adopt a “post-content” strategy?

With the future of search having Google itself doing more of the “searching” on the user’s behalf, we will need to get more creative in our thinking.

We must recognize that surfacing content has never been Google’s priority. It has always been focused on providing information.

Bigger Than Google

The changes on the horizon also signal that the SEO industry ought to start thinking bigger than Google.

What does that mean?

It means expanding the scope of SEO from search to the broader world where algorithms and marketing intersect.

It’s time to start thinking more about how our skills apply to:

  • Content recommendation engines
  • Social media algorithms
  • Ecommerce product recommendation engines
  • Amazon’s search algorithms
  • Smart devices, smart homes, and the internet of things
  • Mobile apps
  • Augmented reality

As doors on search close, new doors open everywhere users are interacting with algorithms that connect to the web and the broader digital world.

SEO professionals should not see the decline of traditional search as a death knell for the industry.

Instead, we should look at the inexorably increasing role algorithms play in peoples’ lives as a fertile ground full of emerging possibilities.

Why Voice Search Will Dominate SEO In 2019 — And How You Can Capitalize On It

By 2020, 30% of all website sessions will be conducted without a screen.

Now, you may be asking yourself, how is that possible?

It turns out that voice-only search allows users to browse the web the Internet and consumer information without actually having to scroll through sites on desktops and mobile devices. And this new technology may be the key to successful brands in the future.

What Is Voice Search?

Voice search essentially allows users to speak into a device as opposed to typing keywords into a search query to generate results.

Audio technology uses speech recognition to understand what users are saying with extreme precision. It then delivers results orally to the user.

Although it seems like a brand-new concept, voice search technology has been around for a while. Programs such as speech-to-text and voice dialing are great examples of voice search.

In addition, programs such as Google Assistant, Siri, Microsoft Cortana and Amazon Alexa all utilize voice search capabilities.

Although specific devices can be optimized for voice search, brands, platforms and websites can be optimized for it as well.

For example, Amazon Alexa can seamlessly search through Spotify’s musical inventory, scan Wikipedia or shop on Amazon quickly at a user’s command. That demonstrates how certain brands chose to optimize their interfaces to be compatible with voice search.

How Voice Search Impacts SEO Rankings

Voice search drastically improves user experience – and because of that, by the year 2020, half of all online searches will be made through voice search.

Due to its prolific use, search engines such as Google are placing a higher emphasis on voice search optimization.

After all, the point of SEO is to rank websites accurately so users can find the best information for their search query as quickly as possible. User experience is, ultimately, at the forefront of search engine optimization.

By January 2018, there was an average of one billion voice searches every month, proving that voice search is on the rise.

But it is important to remember that voice search SEO and traditional website SEO are different. Therefore, some factors that affect website rankings may or may not have the same effect on voice search – and vice versa.

Luckily, there are some tips that can help you balance the two SEO strategies and rank your website for search listings and voice search.

4 Tips To Optimize For Voice Search

When users use voice search, they are typically hoping to complete an action – such as playing a song or purchasing a product – or information on a subject.

But despite the two different intentions, Google uses the same algorithm to rank sites. Below are 5 simple steps to improve voice search rankings, no matter your goal.

1. Ensure Your Website Loads Quickly

Just like traditional search engine optimization, Google voice search favors websites that load quickly. Ensure that:

  • Your site is responsive and works well on mobile devices.
  • Images are optimized.
  • Files are compressed.
  • You utilize website caching to improve page speed.
  • Your server’s response time is reduced.
  • And other tasks that speed up traditional websites.

2. Write The Way That You Speak

When users search for content on desktop or mobile, they tend to write in short, almost bullet-pointed phrases. For example, if a user wanted to find a great web designer, they could type “top web design companies” into Google.

But if they used voice search, a user might say “Who are the top web design companies in the world?”

To ensure your content is optimized for voice search as well, include those long-tail keywords that sound more natural as opposed to shorter, snappier keywords that perform well in desktop SEO.

Plus, keep phrases short and simple. Voice search results are typically written at a 9th-grade reading level at most. So, although your information may be high-level, break it down in a way that is easy for anyone to comprehend.

Pro tip: Although phrases should be short, long-form content still ranks better on both voice search and traditional search listings. Aim for web page content that lands between 1850 and 2500 words.

3. Include Featured Blocks Of Content

The average voice search result is about 29 words long. But although we know that shorter answers perform better, how can we guarantee the content Google will identify and read to users?

Create a featured snippet, of course!

A featured snippet – also called position zero, answer box, or quick answers – is essentially a summary answer from a web page. In desktop search listings, these snippets appear just after the paid ads but before the regular search listings.

To optimize your content for an identifiable featured snippet, include a concise summary of your main content above the fold under 29 words.

Sections that use H-tags, lists, and bullet points are easily readable by Google and thus perform well. Plus, be sure to include your long-tail keywords within the featured snippet.

4. Concentrate On Local Searches

22% of voice search queries are looking for location-based content. Therefore, brands have a higher chance of producing voice search content if they invest in local content.

A New Era of Google Search: Add Google Assistant and voice – What It Means for SEO

Important changes are happening at Google and, in a world where marketing and algorithms intersect, those changes are largely happening under the radar.

The future of search looks like it will have considerably less search in it, and this isn’t just about the end of the 10 blue links, but about much more fundamental changes.

Let’s talk about some of those changes now, and what they mean for SEO.

Google Discover

Google Discover is a content recommendation engine that suggests content across the web based on a user’s search history and behavior.

Discover isn’t completely new (it was introduced in December of 2016 as Google Feed). But Google made an important change in late October (announced in September) when they added it to the Google homepage.

The revamp and rebranding to Discover added features like:

  • Topic headers to categorize feed results.
  • More images and videos.
  • Evergreen content, as opposed to just fresh content.
  • A toggle to tell Google if you want more or less content similar to a recommendation.
  • Google claims the recommendations are personalized to your level of expertise with a topic.

Google Discover hardly feels revolutionary at first. In fact, it feels overdue.

Our social media feeds are already dominated by content recommendation engines, and the YouTube content recommendation engine is responsible for 70% of the time spent on the site.

But Discover could have massive implications for the future of how users interact with content of the web.

While it’s unlikely Discover will ever reach the 70% level of YouTube’s content recommendation engine, if it swallows even a relatively small portion of Google search, say 10%, no SEO strategy will be complete without a tactic for earning that kind of traffic, especially since it will allow businesses to reach potential customers who aren’t even searching for the relevant terms yet.

Google Assistant

For most users, Google Assistant is a quiet and largely invisible revolution.

Its introduction to Android devices in February 2017 likely left most users feeling like it was little more than an upgraded Google Now, and in a sense that’s exactly what it is.

But as Google Assistant grows, it will increasingly influence how users interact with the web and decrease reliance on search.

Like its predecessor, Assistant can:

  • Search the web.
  • Schedule events and alarms.
  • Show Google account info.
  • Adjust device settings.

But the crucial difference is its ability to engage in two-way conversations, allowing users to get answers from the system without ever even looking at a search result.

An incredibly important change for the future of business and the web is the introduction of Google Express, the capability to add products to a shopping cart and order them entirely through Assistant.

But this feature is limited to businesses that are explicitly partnered with Google Express, an incredibly dramatic change from the Google search engine and its crawling of the open web.

Assistant can also identify what some images are. Google Duplex, an upcoming feature, will also allow Assistant to call businesses to schedule appointments and other similar actions on the user’s behalf.

The more users rely on Assistant, the less they will rely on Google search results, and the more businesses who hope to adapt will need to think of other ways to:

  • Leverage Assistant’s algorithms and other emerging technologies to fill in the gaps.
  • Adjust their SEO strategies to target the kind of behavior that is exclusive to search and search alone.

Google’s Declaration of a New Direction

Circa Google’s 20th anniversary, Google announced that its search product was closing an old chapter and opening a new one, with important new driving principles added.

They started by clarifying that these old principles wouldn’t be going away:

  • Focusing on serving the user’s information needs.
  • Providing the most relevant, high-quality information as quickly as possible.
  • Using an algorithmic approach.
  • Rigorously testing every change, including using quality rating guidelines to define search goals.

This means you should continue:

  • Putting the user first.
  • Being accurate and relevant.
  • Having some knowledge of algorithms.
  • Meeting Google’s quality rating guidelines.

But the following principles represent a dramatically new direction for Google Search:

Shifting from Answers to Journeys

Google is adding new features that will allow users to “pick up where they left off,” shifting the focus away from short-term answers to bigger, ongoing projects.

This currently already includes activity cards featuring previous pages visited and queries searched, the ability to add content to collections, and tabs that suggest what to learn about next, personalized to the user’s search history.

A new Topic layer has also been added to the Knowledge Graph, allowing Google to surface evergreen content suggestions for users interested in a particular topic.

Shifting from Queries to Queryless Ways to Provide Information

Perhaps the most important change to watch carefully, Google is looking for ways to help users who don’t even make a search query.

Google Discover is central to this effort and the inclusion of evergreen content, not just fresh content, represents an important change in how Google is thinking about the feed. This means more and more traditional search content will become feed content instead.

Shifting from Text to Visual Representation

Google is making important changes in the way information is presented by adding new visual capabilities.

They are introducing algorithmically generated AMP Stories, video compilations with relevant caption text like age and notable events in a person’s life.

New featured videos have been added to search, designed to offer an overview on topics you are interested in.

Image search has also been updated so that images featured on pages with relevant content take priority and pages where the image is central to the content rank better. Captions and suggested searches have been added as well.

Finally, Google Lens allows you to perform visual search based on objects that Google’s AI can detect in the image.

These changes to search are slipping under the radar somewhat for now, since user behavior rarely changes overnight.

But the likelihood that these features and Google’s new direction will have a dramatic impact on how search works is very high.

SEOs who ignore these changes and continue operating with a 2009 mindset will find themselves losing ground to competitors.

SEO After Search

While queries will always be an important part of the way we find information online, we’re now entering a new era of search.

An era that demands we start changing the way we think about SEO soon, while we can capitalize on the changing landscape.

The situation is not unlike when Google first came on the scene in 1998 when new opportunities were on the horizon that most at the time were unaware of and ill-prepared for.

As the technological landscape changes, we will need to alter our strategies and start thinking about questions and ideas like these in our vision for the future of our brands:

  • Less focus on queries and more focus on context appears inevitable. Where does our content fit into a user’s journey? What would they have learned before consuming it, and what will they need to know next? Note that this is much more vital than simply a shift from keywords to topics, which has been happening for a very long time already. Discovery without queries is much more fundamental and impacts our strategies in a much more profound way.
  • How much can we incorporate our lead generation funnel into that journey as it already exists, and how much can we influence that journey to push it in a different direction?
  • How can we create content and resources that users will want to bookmark and add to collections?
  • Why would Google recommend our content as a useful evergreen resource in Discover, and for what type of user?
  • Can we partner with Google on emerging products? How do we adapt when we can’t?
  • How should we incorporate AMP stories and similar visual content into our content strategy?
  • What type of content will always be exclusive to query-based search, and should we focus more or less on this type of content?
  • What types of content will Google’s AI capacities ultimately be able to replace entirely, and on what timeline? What will Google Assistant and it’s successors never be able to do that only content can?
  • To what extent is it possible for SEOs to adopt a “post-content” strategy?

With the future of search having Google itself doing more of the “searching” on the user’s behalf, we will need to get more creative in our thinking.

We must recognize that surfacing content has never been Google’s priority. It has always been focused on providing information.

Bigger Than Google

The changes on the horizon also signal that the SEO industry ought to start thinking bigger than Google.

What does that mean?

It means expanding the scope of SEO from search to the broader world where algorithms and marketing intersect.

It’s time to start thinking more about how our skills apply to:

  • Content recommendation engines
  • Social media algorithms
  • Ecommerce product recommendation engines
  • Amazon’s search algorithms
  • Smart devices, smart homes, and the internet of things
  • Mobile apps
  • Augmented reality

As doors on search close, new doors open everywhere users are interacting with algorithms that connect to the web and the broader digital world.

SEO professionals should not see the decline of traditional search as a death knell for the industry.

Instead, we should look at the inexorably increasing role algorithms play in peoples’ lives as a fertile ground full of emerging possibilities.

Loup Ventures Says 75% of U.S. Households Will Have Smart Speakers by 2025, Google to Surpass Amazon in Market Share

Loup Ventures has released an updated smart speaker sales forecast model that estimates 28% of the 128 million U.S. households had a smart speaker at the end of 2018. The company expects that figure to grow to 75% by 2025 which due to population growth will represent over 100 million households. Another 85 million households outside the U.S. are also expected to have smart speakers in use. The investment firm also expects 72.5 million smart speakers to be sold in the U.S. in 2019 generating device revenue of $9.8 billion. Those figures are forecasted to rise to 291 million units and $30 billion in 2025 revenue.

GOOGLE HOME (NEST) TO SURPASS AMAZON ECHO MARKET SHARE

The forecast also estimates that the Google Home (Nest) smart speaker product line will surpass Amazon Echo market share in 2023. By 2025, Google is expected to command smart speaker device sales share of 48.1% compared to 44.7% for Amazon Echo. However, at that point, Amazon will still lead Google in total devices sold overall with 640 million to 545 million respectively.

 

Alexa maintains a lead in market share, but Google continues to gain share; we expect this trend to continue based on its utility, as determined by our most recent test of digital assistants.

This is consistent with Voicebot’s analysis in the U.S. Google has risen from zero market share to just under 20% in 2017 to nearly 24% in 2018. In fact, Google Home added 600,000 more users than Amazon Echo in 2018.

During the 2014-2025 period, smart speaker sales in China will reach 287 million total devices sold, including 118 million units in 2025 alone. Combining sales from China, U.S, and the rest of the world, total smart speaker sales will surpass 1 billion units in 2023. Loup does not break out Chinese market share but does show growth rates for 2019 at over 70% that decline through 2025 to under 19%. The China sales forecast only indicates sales by Alibaba and Xioami. So, these figures are likely to be even higher when factoring in Baidu and eventually a WeChat-integrated device from Tencent.

APPLE NOT EXPECTED TO PLAY A BIG ROLE

Another interesting element of Loup Ventures’ current smart speaker forecast is the lackluster performance by Apple. HomePod sales are expected to rise from 2.5 million units in 2018 to no more than six million units in 2025. During the entire period, the Loup analysis expects Apple to sell only 32 million units—just 5% of total Amazon Echo sales. The top year for smart speaker revenue contribution is expected to be 2019 at $1.5 billion. That is forecasted to fall to less than one billion in 2025.

This is a far more pessimistic outlook than Loup Ventures’ early 2018 model which predicted sales of seven million HomePods in 2018 and 11 million in 2019. However, the revised model reflects the reality of Apple’s execution in this market. It has introduced only one high-priced unit that includes very good sound quality but not much else due to Siri’s limitations.